On the off chance that the sound of a leaky faucet, and the idea of how much water you’re wasting, keeping you up around evening time, you’re in luck. Fixing defective faucets is speedy and modest; even the most novice DIYer can handle this task.

Note: When you know the sort of faucet parts make up your sink equipment, you realize how to classify your faucet. Look at our blog section for additional aides on plumbing fixes, including clogs.

1. Fix a Leaky Faucet -Shut Off the Water

2. Remove the Handle

 

3. Remove the Cartridge

  • Turn the valve under your sink to kill the water supply valve or valves. On the off chance that there aren’t individual shutoff valves under the sink, close off the water supply for the house.
  • Turn on the faucet and leave open, permitting the rest of the water in the line to discharge into the sink.

Tip: Insert a sink plug or shield the sink opening with a towel to keep any instruments from tumbling down the drain as you make your fixes.

How you remove the handle depends on your faucet type:

  • If there is a set screw behind the handle, embed a hex key or Allen wrench into the screw and remove it.
  • If the handle has a top screw cover, pry it off with a flat screwdriver and put it in a safe spot. At that point, utilize a Phillips head screwdriver to extricate the screw underneath the cover. Pull the handle-free.

Tip: Insert a sink plug or shield the sink opening with a towel to keep any instruments from tumbling down the drain as you make your fixes.

  • Using a crescent wrench, loosen the packing nut in the handle assembly, then remove and set aside.
  • Gently pull the cartridge straight up and out of the assembly.
  • On some models of a faucet, you may have to remove the cartridge with a specialized tool, which will be indicated on the manufacturer’s instructions.

 Tip: Insert a sink plug or shield the sink opening with a towel to keep any instruments from tumbling down the drain as you make your fixes.

4. Install New Cartridge

  • Clean and dry the area around the handle and all the parts with a cloth.
  • Inspect the O-rings around the housing. Replace any that look damaged or worn.
  • Cartridges come in many shapes and sizes, and the easiest way to find the right replacement part is to know the name of the faucet’s manufacturer and the faucet’s model number. If you’re not sure, take the old cartridge you’re replacing to the store so you can use a reference guide to match it to the exact cartridge you need.
  • Insert a new cartridge, making sure it is aligned correctly.

5. Reattach Faucet Handle

  • Reattach the packing nut and tighten with a crescent wrench; be careful not to overtighten.
  • Reattach the handle with the set screw. Replace the screw cover, if required.
  • Turn your water line back on, remove any debris or towels from your sink, and test out your faucet.
  • Run both hot and cold water through your faucet few for a few minutes to ensure your aerator isn’t clogged.
  • If you find that your faucet is still leaking, it may be time to call an expert plumber.

Tip: The aerator is the piece that screws onto the end of the faucet spout. It can be easily removed and cleaned if the buildup is hindering continuous water flow.